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Bacon's Rebellion

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118      NARRATIVES OF THE INSURRECTIONS      [1676

(who scrupled the Legality of Bacon’s commission) that it
was fairly and freely granted by Governor, Councill and Bur-
gesses, this Ballard being one of the councill, and of those that
both tooke and administer’d Bacon’s Oath.

      There was also an act of Indempnity pass’d to Bacon and
his party who committed the offence on the assembly, and a
Publick Letter of applause and approbation of Bacon’s actions
and Loyalty writ to the King and signed by the Governor and
assembly. Which upon the Breaking up of this Session were
sent abroad and read among the Ignorant People who believ’d
thereby that all was well and nothing coming forth of a long
time to quash, contradict or disowne this Commission, In-
dempnity, Lre etc. granted to Bacon, But on the contrary
other comissions of the Governors own signing and seal’d with
the Publick seal of the Colony coming to them, they were the
more easily inclined to swallow down so fair a bait not seeing
Rebellion at the end of it, and most men grew ambitious of
the service as thinking it both safe and for the Publick good as
having the approbation of the Governor and assembly, at
least there yet appeared nothing to the contrary nor of a good
while after.

       Severall Volunteers and Reformadoes come in to list them-
selves under Bacon, and many were press’d into this serviee,
till at last having his complement of men, and all things else
being in readynesse according as the Assembly had provided
for this expedition, A general Rendezvous is appointed by
Bacon at the Falls of James River, where all things being well
appointed for the march, Bacon makes a speech to his men,
Assuring them all of his Loyalty to his Prince, declaring to
them that his designe was no other than merely to serve his
King and country and to cleere all suspicion of the contrary
(if any were amongst them) by what had bin by him already
acted or Proclamed against him, as also of what he said about
the procuring his comission; hee urges to them the reasons
that induced it, the necessity of that tyme that compell’d him,
the negligence and coldnesse of others that hated him and the
cryes of his Brethrens blood that alarm’d and waken’d him to
this Publique revenge, using what motives hee could to raise
up the spirits of his men. And finally before them all tooke
the oath of allegiance and supremacy, willing his soldiers also

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